Dr. Salvatore Mangione's med students are also artists

Dr. Salvatore Mangione's med students are also artists

"Reincorporating humanities into the curriculum is nothing more than going back to the future. Medicine is the most humanistic of all the sciences and clearly the most scientific of the humanities."

"Reincorporating humanities into the curriculum is nothing more than going back to the future. Medicine is the most humanistic of all the sciences and clearly the most scientific of the humanities."

Dr. Salvatore Mangione's med students write plays, visit museums, and even learn to draw. But these humanities classes aren't extras—they're a vital part of how students at the Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University cultivate empathy, improve their observational skills, and avoid burnout.

Some of his students might think he's old school, but Mangione, an associate professor and physician with Jefferson Health, hopes these innovative courses are actually part of a new wave of medical education, one that imparts wisdom—not just knowledge—to new physicians.

In this episode, Andy and Dr. Mangione unpack why the future of medical education actually lies in its past.


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Med students Tyler Rainer and Matthew Trifan tell us a story

Med students Tyler Rainer and Matthew Trifan tell us a story

Dr. Alan Haber on how telling stories has helped—and not helped—patients

Dr. Alan Haber on how telling stories has helped—and not helped—patients